POP QUIZ

I got asked a question yesterday and I am not sure if its an age thing, to know the answer or not, but i would not expect O S people to readily know the answer. I do,  have used it as well. But who knows what a BULL ROARER IS?

 

Not allowed to google either

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12 thoughts on “POP QUIZ

  1. Take 1xwooden ruler. Drill hole at one end.(traditionally with the compass set you got for geometry) Attach string.(usually shoe laces) Swing the sucker for all ya worth. Hitting mates and non-mates indiscriminately. Nice satisfying ‘whroo- whroo’ noise. Someone grabs ruler in mid-swing and snaps it. Fight ensues.

    Now if you’re an indigenous sort. Its a sound maker with a noise that really travels distances. Sounds like a bovine making territorial noises or mating . . .

    ANd you need to know this . . .why? Thinking of luring some female companionship? Provider for the next BBQ? Pester the neighbours?

  2. Generally a bit of wood (commonly a ruler) with a hole in it tied to a bit of string and swung around to make a loud noise. Communicate oover long distance with them. Many ancient cultures used them. We had to make them at school

  3. Hey Mr Havock.

    A bull roarer is of a flat piece of wood (oval shaped) slightly twisted and suspended from a string at one end. It is whirled round and round at arm’s length turning on its axis and making a whirring sound which grows louder and louder the faster it is swung. To the Australian Aborigine it was the voice of a great ancestral spirit – the voice of the Dreamtime. It was considered a sacred object that was hidden from sight and used only during initiation rites and other important ceremonies. Only the wisest men were able to understand the voice of the bullroarer.

    There is a scene in Crocodile Dundee (CD2 I think) where Mick used one to call some aborigine mates.

    More about them here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullroarer_(music)

  4. I knew before googling but why you ask?

    But yes it’s an age thing…just in case you wanted to know….

  5. We used to make them when we were kids. Thing is you’d occasionally see the bit of wood fly off with a nice bit of velocity on it. Duck!

  6. Never heard of it either Hav. We had plastic rulers which we used as catapults to fire erasers into ceiling fans. There’s probably a story to be told there re the arms race of schoolroom weaponry.

    Wonder if the bull roarer is related to the origin of the phrase ‘not within a bull’s roar’ to mean not coming close to something?

  7. I reckon, Doc you could be onto something there.

    WELL, I am impressed, WHY did I ask the question. Glad you asked.

    I was playing one of my Fav songs..Oils..Bull Roarer and the young fella asked..BULL ROARER?..WTF, I asked if he knew and got that, look of..OK..Dada a complete fucking nut job. So I had to explain it to him. They are LOUD and fucking wicked, but hell, its been a long bloody time, just wanted to see if some of our cultural heritage had been bestowed upon those over 30 still and mores the point, if any of our freewheelin younger generation happened to retain anything from school, although I actually expect this would have been learnt elsewhere ,as our edumicational juggernaut would not have neither the depth nor for thought to include such a wonderful item from our indigionious brethren.

    Guess what hav’s making this weekend..and I am wondering just HOW FUCKING BIG you can make one, one that actually works that is.

  8. Cool, I WOULD BLOODY WELL HOPE SO JB.

    Alas, as its an Indigenous item I will be applying for a TAX PAYER ( think JB contributions) funded grant for its construction…..

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